Zend Framework DAL: DAOs and DataMappers

A Data Access Layer (DAL) is the layer of your application that provides simplified access to data stored in persistent storage of some kind. For example, the DAL might return a reference to an object complete with its attributes instead of a row of fields from a database table.

A Data Access Objects (DAO) is used to abstract and encapsulate all access to the data source. The DAO manages the connection with the data source to obtain and store data. Also, it implements the access mechanism required to work with the data source. The data source could be a persistent store like a database, a file or a Web service.

And finally, the DataMapper pattern is used to move data between the object and a database while keeping them independent of each other. The DataMapper main responsibility is to transfer data between the two and also to isolate them from each other.

Here’s an example of the DataMapper pattern:

Database Table Structure

CREATE TABLE `user` (
 `id` int(11) NOT NULL auto_increment,
 `first_name` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
 `last_name` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
 PRIMARY KEY  (`id`)
)

The User DAO

The DAO pattern provides a simple, consistent API for data access that does not require knowledge of an ORM interface. DAO does not just apply to simple mappings of one object to one relational table, but also allows complex queries to be performed and allows for stored procedures and database views to be mapped into data structures.

A typical DAO design pattern interface is shown below:

interface UserDao
{
    public function fetchRow($id);
    public function fetchAll();
    public function insert($data);
    public function update($id, $data);
    public function delete($id);
}

class UserDatabaseDao implements UserDao
{
    public function fetchRow($id)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource();
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('slave');
        $query = $db->select()->from('user')->where('id = ?', $id);
        return $db->fetchRow($query);
    }

    public function fetchAll()
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource();
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('slave');
        $query = $db->select()->from('user');
        return $db->fetchAll($query);
    }

    public function insert($data)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource();
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('master');
        $db->insert('user', $data);
        return $db->lastInsertId();
    }

    public function update($id, $data)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource();
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('master');
        $condition = $db->quoteInto('id = ?', $id);
        return $db->update('user', $data, $condition);
    }

    public function delete($id)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource();
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('master');
        $condition = $db->quoteInto('id = ?', $id);
        return $db->delete('user', $condition);
    }
}

The User Entity

An Entity is anything that has continuity through a life cycle and distinctions independent of attributes that are important to the application’s user.

class User
{
    protected $id;
    protected $firstName;
    protected $lastName;

    public function setId() {
    }
    public function getId() {
    }
    public function setFirstName() {
    }
    public function getFirstName() {
    }
    public function setLastName() {
    }
    public function getLastName() {
    }
    public function toArray() {
    }
}

The User DataMapper

class UserDataMapper extends Zf_Orm_DataMapper
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->setMap(
            array(
                'id'         => 'id',
                'first_name' => 'firstName',
                'last_name'  => 'lastName'
            )
        );
    }
}

Source Code: http://fedecarg.com/repositories/show/datamapper

The User Repository

Repositories play an important part in DDD, they speak the language of the domain and act as mediators between the domain and data mapping layers. They provide a common language to all team members by translating technical terminology into business terminology.

Lets create a UserRepository class to isolate the domain object from details of the DAO:

class UserRepository
{
    private $databaseDao;

    public funciton setDatabaseDao(UserDao $dao)
    {
        $this->databaseDao = $dao;
    }

    public function getDatabaseDao()
    {
        if (null === $this->databaseDao) {
            $this->setDatabaseDao(new UserDatabaseDao());
        }
        return $this->databaseDao;
    }

    public function find($id)
    {
        $row = $this->getDatabaseDao()->fetchRow($id);
        $mapper = new UserDataMapper();
        $user = $mapper->assign(new User(), $row);

        return $user;
    }
}

The User Controller

class UserController extends Zend_Controller_Action
{
    public function viewAction()
    {
        $userRepository = new UserRepository();
        $user = $userRepository->find($this->_getParam('id'));
        if ($user instanceof User) {
            $id = $user->getId();
            $firstName = $user->getFirstName();
            $lastName = $user->getLastName();
            // get an array of key value pairs
            $row = $user->toArray();
        }
    }
}

That’s all, I hope you’ve found this post useful.

Increase speed and reduce bandwidth usage

Apache’s mod_deflate module provides the DEFLATE output filter that allows output from your server to be compressed before being sent to the client over the network.

There are two ways of enabling gzip compression:

  1. Using Apache’s mod_deflate
  2. Using output buffering

Encoding the output and setting the appropriate headers manually makes the code more portable. Keep in mind that there are hundreds of Linux distributions, each slightly different to significantly different. To allow portability the application should not make assumptions about the OS or config involved.

Using Apache

1. Enable mod_deflate

Debian/Ubuntu:

$ a2enmod deflate
$ /etc/init.d/apache2 force-reload

2. Configure mode_deflate

$ nano /etc/apache2/mods-enabled/deflate.conf

#
# mod_deflate configuration
#
<IfModule mod_deflate.c>
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/plain
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/html
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/xml
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE text/css
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/xml
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/xhtml+xml
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/rss+xml
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/javascript
 AddOutputFilterByType DEFLATE application/x-javascript

 DeflateCompressionLevel 9

 BrowserMatch ^Mozilla/4 gzip-only-text/html
 BrowserMatch ^Mozilla/4\.0[678] no-gzip
 BrowserMatch \bMSIE !no-gzip !gzip-only-text/html

 DeflateFilterNote Input instream
 DeflateFilterNote Output outstream
 DeflateFilterNote Ratio ratio
</IfModule>

Using output buffering

Create a gzip compressed string in your bootstrap file:

try {
    $frontController = Zend_Controller_Front::getInstance();
    if (@strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING'], 'gzip') !== false) {
        ob_start();
        $frontController->dispatch();
        $output = gzencode(ob_get_contents(), 9);
        ob_end_clean();
        header('Content-Encoding: gzip');
        echo $output;
    } else {
        $frontController->dispatch();
    }
} catch (Exeption $e) {
    if (Zend_Registry::isRegistered('Zend_Log')) {
        Zend_Registry::get('Zend_Log')->err($e->getMessage());
    }
    $message = $e->getMessage() . "\n\n" . $e->getTraceAsString();
    /* trigger event */
}

Reference

Use mod_deflate to compress Web content delivered by Apache

Format a time interval with the requested granularity

This class, a refactored version of Drupal’s format_interval function, makes it relatively easy to format an interval value. The format will automatically format as compactly as possible. For example: if the difference between the two dates is only a few hours and both dates occur on the same day, the year, month, and day parts of the date will be omitted.

class DateIntervalFormat
{
    /**
     * Format an interval value with the requested granularity.
     *
     * @param integer $timestamp The length of the interval in seconds.
     * @param integer $granularity How many different units to display in the string.
     * @return string A string representation of the interval.
     */
    public function getInterval($timestamp, $granularity = 2)
    {
        $seconds = time() - $timestamp;
        $units = array(
            '1 year|:count years' => 31536000,
            '1 week|:count weeks' => 604800,
            '1 day|:count days' => 86400,
            '1 hour|:count hours' => 3600,
            '1 min|:count min' => 60,
            '1 sec|:count sec' => 1);
        $output = '';
        foreach ($units as $key => $value) {
            $key = explode('|', $key);
            if ($seconds >= $value) {
                $count = floor($seconds / $value);
                $output .= ($output ? ' ' : '');
                if ($count == 1) {
                    $output .= $key[0];
                } else {
                    $output .= str_replace(':count', $count, $key[1]);
                }
                $seconds %= $value;
                $granularity--;
            }
            if ($granularity == 0) {
                break;
            }
        }

        return $output ? $output : '0 sec';
    }
}

Usage:

$dateFormat = new DateIntervalFormat();
$timestamp = strtotime('2009-06-21 20:46:11');
print sprintf('Submitted %s ago',  $dateFormat->getInterval($timestamp));

Outputs:

Submitted 3 days 4 hours ago

Java, C, Python and nested loops

Java has no goto statement, to break or continue multiple-nested loop or switch constructs, Java programmers place labels on loop and switch constructs, and then break out of or continue to the block named by the label. The following example shows how to use java break statement to terminate the labeled loop:

public class BreakLabel
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int[][] array = new int[][]{{1,2,3,4},{10,20,30,40}};
        boolean found = false;
        System.out.println("Searching 30 in two dimensional int array");

        Outer:
        for (int intOuter = 0; intOuter < array.length ; intOuter++) {
            Inner:
            for (int intInner = 0; intInner < array[intOuter].length; intInner++) {
                if (array[intOuter][intInner] == 30) {
                    found = true;
                    break Outer;
                }
            }
        }

        if (found == true) {
            System.out.println("30 found in the array");
        } else {
            System.out.println("30 not found in the array");
        }
    }
}

Use of labeled blocks in Java leads to considerable simplification in programming effort and a major reduction in maintenance.

On the other hand, the C continue statement can only continue the immediately enclosing block; to continue or exit outer blocks, programmers have traditionally either used auxiliary Boolean variables whose only purpose is to determine if the outer block is to be continued or exited; alternatively, programmers have misused the goto statement to exit out of nested blocks.

What’s interesting is that Python rejected the labeled break and continue proposal a while ago. And here’s why:

Guido van Rossum wrote:

I’m rejecting it on the basis that code so complicated to require this feature is very rare. While I’m sure there are some (rare) real cases where clarity of the code would suffer from a refactoring that makes it possible to use return, this is offset by two issues:

1. The complexity added to the language, permanently.

2. My expectation that the feature will be abused more than it will be used right, leading to a net decrease in code clarity (measured across all Python code written henceforth). Lazy programmers are everywhere, and before you know it you have an incredible mess on your hands of unintelligible code.

But what’s more interesting is that the idea of adding a goto statement was never mentioned. Common sense perhaps?

Google Page Speed: Web Performance Best Practices

When you profile a web page with Page Speed, it evaluates the page’s conformance to a number of different rules. These rules are general front-end best practices you can apply at any stage of web development. Google provides documentation of each of the rules, so whether or not you run the Page Speed tool, you can refer to these pages at any time.

The best practices are grouped into five categories that cover different aspects of page load optimization:

  • Optimizing caching: Keeping your application’s data and logic off the network altogether
  • Minimizing round-trip times: Reducing the number of serial request-response cycles
  • Minimizing request size: Reducing upload size
  • Minimizing payload size: Reducing the size of responses, downloads, and cached pages
  • Optimizing browser rendering: Improving the browser’s layout of a page

Web Performance Best Practices

The Little Manual of API Design

This manual gathers together the key insights into API design that were discovered through many years of software development on the Qt application development framework at Trolltech (now part of Nokia). When designing and implementing a library, you should also keep other factors in mind, such as efficiency and ease of implementation, in addition to pure API considerations. And although the focus is on public APIs, there is no harm in applying the principles described here when writing application code or internal library code.

The Little Manual of API Design (PDF)

E-Books Directory: More than 300 free programming books

Here is a categorized list of online programming books available for free download. The books cover all major programming languages: Ada, Assembly, Basic, C, C#, C++, CGI, JavaScript, Perl, Delphi, Pascal, Haskell, Java, Lisp, PHP, Prolog, Python, Ruby, as well as some other languages, game programming, and software engineering. The books are in various formats for online reading or downloading.

Free Programming Books

Write, share and sell your own books

As commercial book publishing crashes, personal book publishing is booming. Blurb is an online application which can be used to design and print your books in professional looking formats. Blurb makes it easier for you to write, share, promote and sell your own books.

Blurb BookSmart software is the most straightforward and easy to use software available. Multiple demos and tutorials are available, showcasing the potential that each Blurb book offers. Some of the books you buy on Amazon are manufactured with this same technology. You just can’t tell the difference!

From their site:

Holding a finished book with your name on the cover is a truly amazing feeling; it’s one of those experiences everyone should have. As software people, designers and publishing professionals at the top of our game, we realized something both incredible and obvious: there’s no good reason why it should take tons of time, technical skills, big bucks or friends in high places to publish a book. Or a zillion books, for that matter.

Blurb Features

  • Design your book with free software
  • Print your book by ordering online (as few as 1 book needs ordering)
  • Books created are of bookstore quality
  • Free to register and design books
  • Use the site to promote your books
  • Print your books with or without the Blurb Logo

Time to write some books :)

Links

Is Groovy the next programming language in your toolbox?

Groovy offers the flexibility of PHP and the power and capabilities of Java. Groovy meets all the requirements: optional static typing, familiar syntax, runs on a VM, performs as well as Java and supports lots of hot buzzwords like closures and builders. If you are a PHP and/or Ruby developer, I’m sure you are going to love Groovy.

If you are interested in learning more about Groovy and Grails and what it has to offer to your developer toolbox, keep an eye on my blog for some groovy posts :)

Domain-Driven Design: Sample Application

Last updated: 15 Feb, 2010

Part 1: Domain-Driven Design and MVC Architectures
Part 2: Domain-Driven Design: Data Access Strategies
Part 3: Domain-Driven Design: The Repository

Some of the Domain-driven design concepts explained above are applied in this sample application.

Directory Structure

app/
    config/
    controllers/
        UserController.php
    domain/
        entities/
            User.php
            UserProfile.php
        repositories/
            UserRepository.php
    views/
lib/
public/

The domain layer should be well separated from the other layers and it should have few dependencies on the framework you are using.

User Entity

The User and UserProfile objects have a one-to-one relationship and form an Aggregate. An Aggregate is as a collection of related objects that have references between each other. Within an Aggregate there’s always an Aggregate Root (parent Entity), in this case User:

class User
{
    private $id;
    private $name;

    /* @var UserProfile */
    private $profile;

    public function __construct($id, $name)
    {
        $this->id = $id;
        $this->name = $name;
    }

    public function setProfile(UserProfile $profile)
    {
        $this->profile = $profile;
    }

    public function getProfile()
    {
        return $this->profile;
    }
}

class UserProfile
{
    private $id;

    public function __construct($id)
    {
        $this->id = $id;
    }
}

Users Collection

A collection is simply an object that groups multiple elements into a single unit.

class Users
{
    private $elements = array();

    public function __construct(array $users)
    {
        foreach ($users as $user) {
            if (!($user instanceof User)) {
                throw new Exception();
            }
            $this->elements[] = $user;
        }
    }

    public function toArray()
    {
        return $this->elements;
    }
}

User DAO

The UserDAO class allows data access mechanisms to change independently of the code that uses the data:

interface UserDao
{
    public function find($id);
    public function findAll();
}

class UserDatabaseDao implements UserDao
{
    public function find($id)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource()
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('slave');
        $query = $db->select()->from('user')->where('id = ?', $id);
        return $db->fetchRow($query);
    }

    public function findAll()
    {
        ...
        return $db->fetchAll($query);
    }
}

interface UserProfileDao
{
    public function find($id);
    public function findByUserId($id);
}

class UserProfileDatabaseDao implements UserProfileDao
{
    public function find($id)
    {
        ...
    }

    public function findByUserId($id)
    {
        $dataSource = Zf_Orm_Manager::getInstance()->getDataSource()
        $db = $dataSource->getConnection('slave');
        $query = $db->select()->from('user_profile')->where('user_id = ?', $id);
        return $db->fetchRow($query);
    }
}

User Repository

A Repository is basically a collection of Aggregate Roots. Collections are used to store, retrieve and manipulate Entities and Value objects, however, object management is beyond the scope of this post. The Repository object can inject dependencies on demand, making the instantiation process inexpensive.

class UserRepository
{
    /* @var UserDatabaseDao */
    private $userDao;

    /* @var UserProfileDatabaseDao */
    private $userProfileDao;

    public function __construct()
    {
    	$this->userDao = new UserDatabaseDao();
    	$this->userProfileDao = new UserProfileDatabaseDao();
    }

    public function find($id)
    {
        $row = $this->userDao->find($id);
        $user = new User($row['id'], $row['name']);

        $row = $this->userProfileDao->findByUserId($id);
        if (isset($row['id'])) {
            $profile = new UserProfile($row['id']);
            $user->setProfile($profile);
        }

        return $user;
    }

    public function findAll()
    {
        $users = array();
        $rows = $this->userDao->findAll();
        foreach ($rows as $row) {
            $users[] = new User($row['id'], $row['name']);
        }
        return new Users($users);
    }
}

Usage:

$repository = new UserRepository();
$user = $repository->find(1);
$profile = $user->getProfile();
$users = $repository->findAll();

Source Code

http://svn.fedecarg.com/repo/Zf/Orm

Links

If you’re interested in learning more about Domain-driven design, I recommend the following articles:

Domain Driven Design and Development In Practice
Domain-Driven Design in an Evolving Architecture